Flag Counter l'amour triomphe de tout

timothydelaghetto:

lol love this vine

spaceplasma:

Planets of Our Solar System

Our solar system officially has eight planets and one star: the Sun. The discovery of an object larger than Pluto in 2005 rekindled the debate over whether such objects, belonging to the Kuiper Belt – a collection of icy bodies located beyond Neptune – should be called planets. Pluto and other large members of the Kuiper Belt are now considered “dwarf planets.”

Planet facts: space-facts.com

(via organizedatoms)

guiltyhipster:

Friendly reminder that you’re allowed to like a thing without knowing every single fact about the thing

You’re allowed to like a movie without having to know every crew member’s name

You’re allowed to like a book without having to memorize every page

You’re allowed to like a video game without having to know all the Easter eggs and cheat codes

You’re allowed to like things and not be an expert on things

Liking things isn’t supposed to be stressful

(via luvyourselfsomeesteem)

Have you ever noticed that humans have made it so difficult and complicated to “survive” in this world? It’s a vicious cycle. You go to school, and try really hard, so that you can get into a good college, and then you try really hard at college to get a good job, and then you try really hard at your job, so you can make money. And then your kids do the same thing. And everyone just keeps on doing this and no one even stops to think WHY they’re doing it any more. Everyone just does it because it’s what you’re supposed to do. And like, before, when the human race had just started, the goal was to just SURVIVE. People just lived. I mean, that’s what really matters, right? Survival. Because after you die, it doesn’t matter what college you went to.

Dylan, my 12 year old brother (via bl-ossomed)

(via tinycoca)

dreland:

asylum-art:

Njideka Akunyili Crosby-A Nigerian Visual Artist

Njideka Akunyili Crosby“My art addresses my internal tension between my deep love for Nigeria, my country of birth, and my strong appreciation for Western culture, which has profoundly influenced both my life and my art. I use my art as a way to negotiate my seemingly contradictory loyalties to both my cherished Nigerian culture that is currently eroding and to my white American husband. Most of the Nigerian traditions I experienced growing up are quickly disappearing due to the permeation of Western culture and the ensuing opinion that being ”too Nigerian” is uncool. I feel dismayed by Nigerians’ unquestioningly valuing anything Western as superior however, my awareness of this problem does not exempt me from it – indeed, I question whether this mentality played a part in my falling in love with my husband. My art serves as a vehicle through which I explore my conflicted allegiance to two separate cultures.” Njideka Akunyili

ice

(via justbueller)